Welcome to the Trester Hoist Blog page. Here we will talk about information on products, safety and more. 

CM ShopStar VS - Electric Chain hoist with variable speed capabilities in 115v control

Posted by Robyn

The CM ShopStar VS variable speed electric chain hoist is built for rugged industrial and commercial applications where precision load control is critical. This durable hoist features a high H4-plus duty cycle and a compact design ideal for use at workstations and production lines. The ShopStar VS is a superior alternative to air hoists.

 Benefits & Features

RUGGED & DURABLE
Thermally protected hoist motor. Rugged, cast aluminum alloy hoist frame and body feature durable epoxy powder-coat finish to protect against corrosion.

LOW MAINTENANCE
Gear train lifetime lubricated with non-oxidizing grease. Totally enclosed hoist frame protects motor from environmental contamination.

COMPACT DESIGN
Small, compact design makes hoist ideal for use in tight spaces and allows for easy installation and maintenance.

OVERLOAD PROTECTION
Standard overload device protects the hoist, operator and surrounding structure from damaging overloads.

LONG CHAIN LIFE
Durable CM Hoistaloy® Load Chain. 10-pocket, oblique-lay lift wheel for longer chain life.

SINGLE- & 3-PHASE VOLTAGE OPTIONS
100 to 240 volt single phase, 50 to 60 Hz. 208 to 240 volt 3 phase. 460 volt and 575 volt 3 phase with optional transformer. 6-1/2 ft. power cord with removable molded, 3-prong 115-volt plug.

H4 PLUS DUTY CYCLE
With 300+ motor starts per hour and Class F motor insulation, the ShopStar VS outperforms the H3 rating of its major competitors.

5:1 DESIGN FACTOR

NEMA 4 INDUSTRIAL-RATED CONTROL SYSTEM

STANDARD RIGID-HOOK SUSPENSION

MADE IN THE USA

UL LISTED

LIFETIME WARRANTY


Optional Features

CM ROCKET PENDANT
Engineered for maximum operator comfort, the CM Rocket delivers precision load control. Pendant features a unique rocker switch and comfort-fit design that increases safety and efficiency. Not available for 3-step infinitely variable hoist models. Pendant with emergency stop not available on ShopStar VS.

VARIABLE CONTROLS
Choose from 2-speed, 2-step infinitely variable, 3-speed and 3-step infinitely variable controls for single and 3-phase applications.

DURABLE CHAIN CONTAINERS
Impact-resistant plastic/mesh or metal chain containers.

SWIVEL HOOK SUSPENSION
Swivel hook suspension rotates 360º for easy installation and positioning. Swivel hooks are available with latch and Latchlok® latch. Lug mount suspension is also available.

Discounted Jib & Gantry Systems

Posted by Robyn

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CM Electric and Manual Units - Discounted for our customer appreciation event

Posted by Robyn

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Customer Appreciation Discounts on IR and CM Hoists

Posted by Robyn

We will be offering special discounts on products featured at our upcoming Customer Appreciation - Open House event

Discounted pricing available until August 8th or while supplies last.  

Call Trester today to get your discounted hoist!

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Ingersoll Rand CLK Hoist Information

Posted by Robyn

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Ingersoll Rand MLK Information

Posted by Robyn

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Ingersoll Rand Air Hoists - Discounted for our Customer Appreciation Event

Posted by Robyn

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Using Lifting Magnets in your Facility

Posted by Robyn

Do you need to carry semi-finished products such as machined parts, castings, press molds, steel plates, bars, tubes and more?

Eriez magnets are available in ceramic and rare earth models, lift up to 10,000pounds, need no outside power source and can be turned ON and OFF with ease.

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Benefits of lifting with Magnets:

  • Safely lift and move steel without direct attachment by slings, hooks or cables  - No damage to product
  • Magnets possess a unique property of attraction which can be harnessed to ease and speed one’s work.
  • Immediate improvement in efficiency and operating economy.
  • Available electro or permanent
  • Easily pile, unpile or lift and move steel plate and shapes

 The factors that have bearing on the lifting magnet selection for any specific application are:

  • Weight, shape and area to be lifted
  • Surface condition of load and magnet
  • Stiffness or flexibility of load
  • Range of sizes and shapes to be lifted by the magnet or magnets
  • Interpretation of magnet lifting power when less than full magnet face is utilized 

Magnet Options:

RPL Series - Low Capacity, Manual Operation

XPL Series - Wide ranges of diameters on round materials

EPL Series - Highest rated capacity

APL Series - Crane activated ON/OFF

MPL Series - For limited accessibility applications

Magnetic Separators

Burn Table Magnets

 

 


 

Equipment for the Metalworking Industry

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Equipment for Metalworking Industry

Posted by Robyn

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MPL Series

Posted by Robyn

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APL Series

Posted by Robyn

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EPL Series

Posted by Robyn

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XPL Series

Posted by Robyn

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RPL Series

Posted by Robyn

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Burn Table Lift Magnet System

Posted by Robyn

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Magnetic Separators

Posted by Robyn

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Lifting Magnets

Posted by Robyn

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Cost Savings of participating in our Customized Preventative Maintenance Program

Posted by Robyn

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Preventative Maintenance Requirements

Posted by Robyn

Lets talk about the exciting world of preventative maintenance!


Everyone knows it has to be done, in fact ASME, CMAA, OSHA, and the manufacturers all require it. Yet most people don’t do it.

Why?


For a number of reasons: Out of sight, out of mindThese units are up in the ceiling, and as long as they are working, no one puts much thought into them. Another factor is time. Maintenance personal are busy people. They need to keep every machine up and running so product flows out the door. There just isn’t time to work on working equipment.

Whatever the reason may be, the fact remains that it needs to be done. Lack of lubrication is one of the leading causes of equipment failure, and equipment failure is costly. For example, lets take the simple act of lubricating the chain. When a chain lacks lubrication, it wears. This is what we call “stretch”, because the inner link wear elongates the chain. When this happens, it no longer fits into the liftwheel, which is specifically sized for that chain. This wears the liftwheel, and the guides that surround it, and in extreme cases, can even break the frames, which hold the guides. With labor, that repair would cost upwards of $1500 with the hoist being out of service for 5-15 days. Ouch! If you figure in your downtime too, you are looking at a very costly repair. And that’s just for the chain…

As parts become more expensive, and the manufacturers are more and more looking at hoists as being “disposable”, it becomes increasingly important to protect the investment you've already made.

Call Trester today to learn about our Customized Preventative Maintenance Program - and how much time and money it will save you.


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Introducing the CM Tornado 360 Ratchet Lever Hoist

Posted by Robyn

Introducing the CM Tornado 360°

Ratchet Lever Hoist

Capacities: ¾ & 1-1/2 tons
Standard Lifts: Up to 20 ft.

Tornado image.jpgRedefining lever-operated hoists, the CM® Tornado 360°™ features the revolutionary Sidewinder™ lever handle that allows for efficient operation in both lifting and pulling applications. Ergonomically designed for increased safety, the patent-pending CM Tornado 360° lets the operator to work up to 12 times faster and with as much as 30% less pull force than with conventional ratchet lever tools.

See the Tornado in Action

 Benefits & Features

SIDEWINDER LEVER HANDLE
This first-of-its-kind lever handle design will revolutionize the ratchet lever hoist industry. Its unique foldable handle and 360° rotating lever increases productivity while reducing the risk of operator injury.

CONVENIENT DIRECTIONAL INDICATOR
Easy-to-use, highly visible directional indicator located on the handle clearly shows the operating direction as lifting, lowering or neutral.

EASY & SMOOTH FREE CHAINING
For quick take up and positioning of slack chain - even with one hand. Designed not to accidently free chain while under load. Cast chain end stop allows the user to easily position the chain in free-chaining mode and prevents it from entering the liftwheel and jamming the hoist.

POSITIVE LOAD CONTROL
Enclosed Weston-type brake stays clean and dry for precise load positioning.

BUILT TO LAST
Lightweight aluminum housing withstands rigorous use and features high-quality, long-lasting bearings. Powder coat finish provides extra protection in harsh environments.

MEETS ASME B30.21

EXCELLENT CORROSION PROTECTION
Robust chain guide and chain stripper made from cast steel and zinc-plated for corrosion protection.

100% LOAD TESTED GOLD CHROMATE CHAIN
Designed and manufactured in the U.S.A. by Columbus McKinnon. Protects against corrosion. (Canadian units feature corrosion-resistant, zinc-plated chain.)

EASY-TO-INSPECT SWIVEL HOOKS
Bolt-on hooks with nylon locks help users comply with ASME B30.21 and B30.10 inspection requirements. Hooks are forged, allowing them to yield under overload without breaking. Cast safety latches provide positive and secure load engagement.

INDUSTRY-LEADING WARRANTY
Our lifetime warranty on all mechanical components, including the Sidewinder lever handle, is the industry's best warranty against manufacturing and material defects.

With our 3-year brake warranty, if the brake discs wear out within 3 years from the date of purchase, CMCO will replace the ratchet disc assembly free of charge.

EASY IDENTIFICATION
Each unit has a unique serial number for easy and accurate identification.

LIFETIME WARRANTY

Optional Features

SHIPYARD HOOKS
Available on 1-1/2 ton unit.

CM SMART ID™ RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION
Simplify inventory and inspection management processes. (Available on U.S. units only)

Who governs the overhead hoist and crane industry?

Posted by Robyn

Our industry is governed by a collection of authoritative bodies; associations, industrial groups and governmental agencies. Some of these bodies are listed below, along with their web sites where you can learn more about each organization and purchase copies of their standards, specifications and other printed materials. 

CMAA

The primary industry group, CMAA — Crane Manufacturers Association of America, Inc. — provides standards, specifications, market research initiatives, industry statistics, literature and publications.

  • CMAA Specification #70, Top Running Bridge and Gantry Type Multiple Girder Electric Overhead Traveling Cranes
  • CMAA Specification #74, Top Running and Under Running Single Girder Electric Traveling Cranes Utilizing Under Running Trolley Hoist
  • CMAA Specification #78, Standards and Guidelines for Professional Services Performed On Overhead and Traveling Cranes and Associated Equipment
  • CMAA Crane Operator’s Manual

For more information, go to: www.mhia.org/industrygroups/cmaa 

HMI

The Hoist Manufacturers Institute (HMI), which is part of MHIA, provides a variety of Educational Materials, Marketing Information and Standards Development as they relate to hoisting equipment.

For more information, go to: www.mhia.org/industrygroups/hmi

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ASME provides codes and standards, publications, conferences, continuing education and professional development. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) is a privately funded federation of business and industry, standards developers, trade associations, labor unions, professional societies, consumers, academia, and government agencies. ANSI does not itself write standards.

  • ASME – ANSI B30.2, Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge, Single or Multiple Girder, Top Running Hoist)
  • ASME – ANSI B30.7, Base Mounted Drum Hoists
  • ASME – ANSI B30.9, Slings
  • ASME – ANSI B30.10, Hooks
  • ASME – ANSI B30.11, Monorails and Underhung Cranes
  • ASME – ANSI B30.16, Overhead Hoists (Underhung)
  • ASME – ANSI B30.17, Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge, Single Girder, Underhung Hoist)
  • ASME – ANSI B30.20, Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices
  • ASME – ANSI B30.21, Manually Lever Operated Hoists

For more information, go to: www.ansi.org           

 

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OSHA Standards

OSHA 1910.179 Standard

Posted by Robyn

Q.

 

Does the OSHA standard 1910.179 on overhead and gantry cranes apply to overhead wire and chain hoists?

A.

 

Not specifically. Many of the requirements are the same, but underhung hoists are specifically addressed in the consensus standard ANSI/ASME B30.16

Q.

 

Can OSHA cite me for not following a consensus standard?

A.

 

Yes. Industry consensus standards might be evidence that a hazard is recognized and there is a feasible means of correcting such a hazard. If you do not follow the consensus standard, it is possible to be cited under the general duty clause.

Overhead hoists are found in many industries. They can be made with chain or wire rope and can be operated manually or with electric or air power. These units can be an essential part of a production line used to load raw materials or move finished goods. As vital as they can be to the production line, they are often some of the more neglected equipment in a facility, many times only getting attention after they fail or are no longer functioning. Preventive maintenance and frequent overhead hoist inspection can prevent costly downtime and potentially dangerous situations.

Overhead Hoist Regulations

Overhead hoist inspection and testing requirements, specifically for underhung overhead hoists, are not found in an OSHA standard. Some relevant information can be found in general industry standard 29 CFR 1910.179, which addresses overhead and gantry cranes. The standard that most specifically addresses the requirements of overhead hoists is an ASME/ANSI consensus standard, B30.16 for overhead hoists (underhung). This standard is part of the B30 series of standards from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) on cableways, cranes, derricks, hoists, hooks, jacks and slings. Some of the highlights of the inspection requirements from the B30.16 standards are outlined below. The complete standard is available for purchase directly from ASME.

 Overhead Hoist Inspection Requirements

A designated person should inspect hoists before their initial use and on regular intervals to verify compliance with ASME/ANSI B30.16. The specific inspection requirements are found in Table 1 and Table 2 of the B30.16 standard. The inspections are classified into frequent inspections that do not require documentation and periodic inspections that require documentation. The interval between inspections depends on the service of the hoist. The owner's manual specific to the hoist is another good source for inspection and maintenance requirements and should be based on the requirements of this standard.

Do you Need Specialized Lifting Equipment?

Posted by Robyn

Does your application need specialized lifting equipment?  

Do you need to lift at two points from one crane?  

Do you need adjustable options to be used for multiple applications?

Lifting beams are the safest way to lift products from multiple points.  These can be adjusted to accommodate unbalanced loads.  Lifting beams are available with swivel hooks, eye bolts and shackle plates.  They can be built with non-conductive materials to insulate against sparks and can be built for ultra-low headroom applications.  

Check out our lifting beam options below:

Adjustable Length Lifting Beams with Swivel Hook Bottoms

 

Adjustable Length Lifting Beams with Shackle Bottoms

 

Adjustable Economy Lifting Beams

 

Twin Hoist Lifting Beam

 

Ultra Low Headroom Lifting Beams

 

Low Headroom, Multiple Length Standard Lifting Beam

 

Non-Conductive Lifting Beam

 

Small Length Lift Beams - Lift Bale Top

 

Coil Lifters

Adjustable Length Lifting Beams with Shackle Bottoms

Posted by Robyn

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Coil Lifters

Posted by Robyn

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Small Length Lift Beams - Lift Bale Top

Posted by Robyn

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Non-Conductive Lifting Beam

Posted by Robyn

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Low Headroom, Multiple Length Standard Lifting Beam

Posted by Robyn

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Ultra Low Headroom Lifting Beams

Posted by Robyn

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Twin Hoist Lifting Beam

Posted by Robyn

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Adjustable Economy Lifting Beams

Posted by Robyn

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Adjustable Length Lifting Beams with Swivel Hook bottoms

Posted by Robyn

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Overbraced Tie Rod Jib Crane 2 Ton Capacity

Posted by Robyn

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Heavy Duty Floor Mounted Jib Crane 2 Ton Capacity

Posted by Robyn

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Fixed Height Gantry Crane 1 to 5 Ton Capacities

Posted by Robyn

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Heavy Duty Floor Mounted Jib Crane 1/2 Ton Capacity

Posted by Robyn

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Heavy Duty Floor Mount Jib Crane 1 Ton Capacity

Posted by Robyn

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Heavy Duty Floor Mounted Jib Crane 3 Ton Capacity

Posted by Robyn

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Heavy Duty Floor Mounted Jib Crane 5 Ton Capacity

Posted by Robyn

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Light Duty Floor Mounted Jib Crane 1/4 Ton Capacity

Posted by Robyn

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Light Duty Floor Mounted Jib Crane 1/2 Ton Capacity

Posted by Robyn

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Overbraced Tie Rod Jib Crane 1/2 to 1 Ton Capacities

Posted by Robyn

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Pillar Mounted Jib Cranes 1/2 Ton Capacity

Posted by Robyn

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Pillar Mounted Jib Crane 1 Ton Capacity

Posted by Robyn

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Pillar Mounted Jib 2 Ton Capacity

Posted by Robyn

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Telescoping Gantry 1 to 5 Ton Capacities

Posted by Robyn

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Fixed Height Gantry Cranes

Posted by Robyn

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Cantilevered Wall Mounted Jib Cranes

Posted by Robyn

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Foundationless Floor Mounted Jib Cranes

Posted by Robyn

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Comparing Small Crane Options

Posted by Robyn

Floor Mounted Jib Cranes

Ideal in open areas to serve several work stations, in outdoor applications such as loading docks, or in maching and assembly operations where they can be overlapped with other jib cranes to provide staged coverage.

Wall Mounted Jib Cranes

Provides 200 degree rotation for hoist coverage in individual bays, along walls or columns of plants.  Also used as a supplement to an overhead crane or monorail system.  This jib has the advantage of providing maximum lift for the hoist.

Gantry Cranes

 

An economical way to lift materials anywhere in a facility.  The wheels enable you to move the gantry around your facility.  This cost effective solution for areas of infrequent lifts will give you flexibility and strength.

Options:

Options:

Options:

Contact Jason@tresterhoist.com or Fitz@tresterhoist.com to discuss which crane option will work best for your application.  

Our remote controls have been a real game changer...

Posted by Robyn

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Trester Hoist and Equipment is certified as a women's business enterprise

Posted by Robyn

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Magnetek's Flex Mini Radio Controls

Posted by Robyn

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Magnetek's Enrange Flex Ex Remotes

Posted by Robyn

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Discounted Remote Controls - Until May 31st

Posted by Robyn

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Why use Remote Controls?

Posted by Robyn

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Easy Frequent Inspections You Can Do In House!

Posted by Robyn

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Overhead Crane Inspection Requirements

Posted by Robyn

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Wire Rope Hoist Options

Posted by Robyn

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Factors to consider when choosing a wire rope hoist

Posted by Robyn

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What industries use wire rope hoists?


Wire Rope hoists are used in many industries, including: Energy, Mining, Government, Construction, Power Generation, Agriculture, Marine, General Manufacturing, Logging, Transportation, Aerospace, Pulp & Paper Mills, Oil & Gas, Waste Water Treatment, Steel Fabrication and Industrial Facilities.  They can be customized for many unique applications also.  

What factors should you consider when choosing a wire rope hoist?

  • Capacity
  • Power application - Electric or air?
  • Lift requirement - extra long lift option?
  • Reeving - do you need true vertical lift?
  • Headroom
  • Suspension - hook, lug, push trolley, underhung or top running trolley? 
  • Do you need explosion proof or spark resistance?
  • Will this be a heavy usage application?
  • Hot metal application?
  • Food processing or clean room?

Here are wire rope hoist comparisons.


What advantages do you want in your next wire rope hoist?  

  • A welded steel or stamped steel cover?  
  • Are you looking for longer lasting trolley wheels?  
  • A Nema 4/12 ssteel enclosure control panel?  
  • A protected drum design to prevent possible contamination?   

Be sure to look at the Yale Global King hoist - the advantages below may surprise you.

Many models can ship within 48 hours.

 

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Fast Shipping on Wire Rope hoists and Plug & Play Crane Kits

Posted by Robyn

FLEX-48 Quick Ship Program

Do you need a wire rope hoist or crane kit in a rush?  Can you wait 48 hours?  

For customers in the United States, Yale Global King and Shaw-Box World Series hoists are available as Quick Ship units shipping within 48 hours (2 business days) directly from CM's factory located in Wadesboro, North Carolina.  Ordering is simple  Just call Trester Hoist and we can help you determine your catalog number and product brand kit number.

Model Variations Include:

  • 2 Monorail Units ready for installation in existing crane systems
  • 3 Complete Plug & Play Crane Kits suitable for up to 50 ft. maximum bridge spans
  • 1 Complete Plug & Play Crane Kit suitable for up to 60 ft. maximum bridge spans

If the specifications of the Flex-48 Quick Ship models do not match your exact needs, please contact Trester Hoist for a quote.

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Grade 100 Chain Sling Capacities

Posted by Robyn

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Grade 80 Chain Sling Capacities

Posted by Robyn

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Round Sling Capacities

Posted by Robyn

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Web Endless Sling Capacities - Light Duty

Posted by Robyn

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Web Eye and Eye Sling Capacities - Heavy Duty

Posted by Robyn

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Web Eye and Eye Sling Capacities - Light Duty

Posted by Robyn

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Wire Rope Sling Capacities

Posted by Robyn

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What are the requirements for Sling Inspections?

Posted by Robyn

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We are asked all the time how often OSHA (or ASME or ANSI) require slings to be inspected and if there is a requirement for documentation.  

OSHA divides types of slings into six categories:

  1. Alloy Steel Chain Slings
  2. Wire Rope Slings
  3. Metal Mesh Slings
  4. Natural and Synthetic Fiber Rope Slings
  5. Synthetic Web Slings
  6. Synthetic Round Slings

All of the above slings require a "frequent" inspection to be conducted by the operator before every shift or use.  A "periodic" inspection should also be done by a qualified person at least once every 12 months.  

The frequency of all inspections will depend on frequency of sling use, severity of service conditions, nature of lifts being made and experience gained during the service life of slings used in similar conditions.  

Frequent inspections should be conducted daily or before each shift.  Designate a qualified person to inspect all slings, fastenings and attachments before using them.  Check for damage or defects.  Damaged or defective slings must be immediately removed from service.

Periodic Inspections should be conducted at least once every 12 months and it's recommended to be done by a person other than the frequent-inspector or operator.  ASME requires written documentation for this inspection.  Trester Hoist & Equipment can conduct your periodic inspection on site and load all of your sling information into our online program creating an online inventory of your slings.  Any sling showing damage, deterioration or defect will be removed from service immediately.  

Although OSHA does not require written documentation for the periodic inspections (with the exception of the alloy steel chain slings), ASME does require documentation for all sling types.  

ASME B30.9C5-2014 states:

Inspection Records.  Written inspection records, utilizing the identification for each sling as established by the user, should be kept for all slings.  These records should show a description of the sling and its condition on each periodic inspection.

Contact Jason at 262-409-5255 or Fitz at 262-290-8440 to schedule your Periodic Inspection today with our trained Service Technicians.  

OSHA Guidance on Safe Sling Use - Synthetic Web Slings

Posted by Robyn

 Synthetic Web Slings:

Synthetic web slings offer a number of advantages for rigging purposes.  The most commonly used synthetic web slings are made of nylon- or polyester-type yarns (Fig. 7).  They have the following properties in common:

  • Strength,
  • Convenience,
  • Load protection, and
  • Economy.

Each synthetic material has its own unique properties.

Certain synthetic materials perform better than others in specific applications and environments. Consult the sling manufacturer or a qualified person for a specific application or before using in and around chemical environments.

Synthetic webbing materials other than nylon and polyester are also used and the manufacturer should be consulted for specific data for proper use.

Identification:

New slings are marked by the manufacture to show:

  • The rated load for each type of hitch, and
  • The type of synthetic web material.

In addition, slings may be marked to show:

  • The manufacturer's code or stock number, and
  • The name or trademark of the manufacturer.

Rated loads:

Rated loads (capacities) for single-leg vertical, choker, basket hitches, and two-leg bridle slings are as shown in Tables 21 through 25.

For angles not shown, use the next lower angle or a qualified person to calculate the rated load. Rated loads are based on:

  • Material strength,
  • Design factor,
  • Type of hitch,
  • Angle of loading (see Fig. 3),
  • Diameter of curvature over which the sling is used, and
  • Fabrication efficiency.

Do not use horizontal angles less than 30 degrees except as recommended by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person.

The rated load for a sling in a choker hitch is the value in Tables 21 through 25, provided that the angle of the choke is 120 degrees or more (see Fig. 2).  For angles of choke less than 120 degrees, use the reduced rated load values provided by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person. For other synthetic webbing materials and for configurations not shown, use the rated loads provided by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person.

Fittings:

Ensure that mechanical fittings used as part of a synthetic web sling meet the following:

  • Materials are compatible with the mechanical and environmental requirements of the sling,
  • Fittings have a rated load at least the same as the synthetic webbing sling,
  • Fittings have sufficient strength to sustain twice the rated load of the sling without visible permanent deformation, and
  • Surfaces are clean, and sharp edges are removed.

Inspections:

Designate a qualified person[1] to inspect slings each day before use for damage or defects.

This qualified person also performs additional periodic inspections where service conditions warrant, as determined on the basis of:

  • Frequency of sling use,
  • Severity of service conditions,
  • Nature of lifts being made, and
  • Experience gained during the service life of slings used in similar circumstances.

Make periodic inspections of synthetic web slings at intervals no greater than 12 months.  A good guide to follow includes:

  • Yearly for normal service use,
  • Monthly to quarterly for severe service use, and
  • As recommended by a qualified person for special and infrequent service use.

Although OSHA's sling standard does not require you to make and maintain records of inspections, the ASME standard contains provisions on inspection records.[3]

Make a thorough inspection of slings and attachments. Items to look for include:

  • Missing or illegible sling identification,
  • Acid or caustic burns,
  • Melting or charring of any part of the sling,
  • Holes, tears, cuts, or snags,
  • Broken or worn stitching in load bearing splices,
  • Excessive abrasive wear,
  • Knots in any part of the sling,
  • Discoloration and brittle or stiff areas on any part of the sling,
  • Pitted, corroded, cracked, bent, twisted, gouged, or broken fittings, and
  • Other conditions that cause doubt as to continued use of a sling.

Where any such damage or deterioration is present, remove the sling or attachment from service immediately.

Repairing/Reconditioning:

Do not use worn or damaged slings or attachments. Discard or repair them. Use damaged slings only after they are repaired, reconditioned, and proof tested by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person using the following criteria:

  • Ensure that the manufacturer or a qualified person performs repairs,
  • Ensure that repairs of hooks and fittings meet ASME B30.10 and B30.26,
  • Do not repair cracked, broken, melted, or damaged webbing material,
  • Do not repair load-bearing splices,
  • Do not make any temporary repairs of synthetic webbings or fittings, and
  • Mark repaired slings to identify who made the repairs.

Retain the certificates of proof test and make them available for examination.[2]

Operating practices:

Do not use synthetic web slings with loads in excess of the rated load capacities described in the appropriate tables.  Ensure that synthetic web slings have suitable characteristics for the type of load, hitch, and environment in which they will be used and that they are not used with loads in excess of the rated load capacities described in the appropriate tables. Consult the sling manufacturer or a qualified person for synthetic web slings not included in the tables. Follow other safe operating practices, including:

Sling Selection

  • For multiple-leg slings used with nonsymmetrical loads, ensure that an analysis by a qualified person is performed to prevent overloading of any leg,
  • Ensure that multiple-leg slings are selected according to Tables 21 through 25 when used at the specific angles given in the table. Ensure that operations at other angles are limited to rated loads of the next lower angle given in the table or calculated by a qualified person, and
  • Ensure that the fitting is the proper shape and size to ensure that it is seated properly in the hook or lifting device.

Cautions to Personnel

  • Ensure that all portions of the human body are kept away from the areas between the sling and the load and between the sling and the crane or hoist hook,
  • Ensure that personnel never stand in line with or next to the legs of a sling that is under tension,
  • Ensure that personnel do not stand or pass under a suspended load,
  • Ensure that personnel do not ride the sling or the load, unless the load is specifically designed and tested for carrying personnel, and
  • Do not use synthetic webbing slings as bridles on suspended personnel platforms.

Effects of Environment

  • Store slings in an area where they will not be subjected to mechanical, chemical, or ultraviolet damage, or to extreme temperatures,
  • When slings are exposed to extreme temperatures, follow the guidance provided by the sling manufacturer or qualified person.
  • Consult the sling manufacturer for recommended inspection procedures when nylon or polyester webbing slings are extensively exposed to sunlight or ultraviolet light.

Rigging Practices

  • Ensure that slings are hitched in a manner providing control of the load,
  • Ensure that sharp edges in contact with slings are padded with material of sufficient strength to protect the sling,
  • Ensure that slings are shortened or adjusted only by methods approved by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person,
  • Ensure that, during lifting with or without a load, personnel are alert for possible snagging,
  • Ensure that, in a basket hitch, the load is balanced to prevent slippage,
  • When using a basket hitch, ensure that the legs of the sling contain or support the load from the sides, above the center of gravity, so that the load remains under control,
  • Do not drag slings on the floor or over abrasive surfaces,
  • Ensure that, in a choker hitch, the choke point is only on the sling body, never on a splice or fitting,
  • Ensure that, in a choker hitch, an angle of choke less than 120 degrees is not used without reducing the rated load,
  • Ensure that slings are not constricted, bunched, or pinched by the load, hook, or any fitting,
  • Ensure that the load applied to the hook is centered in the base (bowl) of the hook to prevent point loading on the hook, unless the hook is designed for point loading,
  • Ensure that an object in the eye of a sling is not wider than one-third the length of the eye,
  • Do not shorten or lengthen a sling by knotting or twisting,
  • Do not rest loads on the sling,
  • Do not pull a sling from under a load when the load is resting on the sling,
  • Do not allow shock loading, and
  • Avoid twisting and kinking.

Proof testing:

Before initial use, ensure that all synthetic webbing slings incorporating previously used or welded fittings and all repaired slings are proof tested by the manufacturer or a qualified person.

Other new synthetic webbing slings and fittings need not to be proof tested, although the employer may require proof testing in purchasing specifications.

Environmental effects:

Temperature

Do not allow nylon and polyester slings to be used in contact with objects or at temperatures in excess of 194 degrees F (90 degrees C), or below minus 40 degrees F (minus 40 degrees C).

Sunlight & Ultraviolet

Long-term exposure to sunlight or ultraviolet radiation can affect the strength of synthetic webbing slings. Consult the sling manufacturer for proper retirement criteria for synthetic webbing slings subjected to long-term storage or use in sunlight.

Chemical

The strength of synthetic webbing slings can be degraded by chemically active environments. This includes exposure to chemicals in the form of solids, liquids, vapors or fumes. Consult the sling manufacturer before using slings in chemically active environments.

https://www.osha.gov/dsg/guidance/slings/synth-web.html

OSHA Guidance on Safe Sling Use - Natural & Synthetic Fiber Rope Slings

Posted by Robyn

Natural and Synthetic Fiber Rope Slings:

Natural and synthetic fiber rope slings are used primarily for temporary work, such as construction and painting jobs, and in marine operations. Fiber rope slings are pliant, grip loads well, and do not mar the surface of the load.

The most common constructions for fiber rope slings are 3-strand laid, 8-strand plaited, and hollow braided nylon and polyester. Fiber rope slings have the following properties in common:

  • Strength,
  • Safety,
  • Convenience,
  • Load protection,
  • Long life,
  • Economy,
  • Shock absorbency, and
  • Temperature resistance.

Identification:

New slings are marked by the manufacture to show:

  • The rated load for the types of hitches, and the angle upon which they are based,
  • The name or trademark of the manufacturer,
  • The manufacturer's code or stock number, and
  • The type of material and construction.

Rated loads:

Rated loads (capacities) for single-leg vertical, choker, and basket hitches are as shown in Tables 18 through 20

For angles not shown, use the next lower angle or a qualified person to calculate the rated load. Rated loads are based on:

  • Material strength,
  • Design factor,
  • Type of hitch (see Fig. 5),
  • Angle of loading (see Fig. 3), and
  • Diameter of curvature over which the sling is used (D/d) (see Fig. 6).

Do not use horizontal angles less than 30 degrees except as recommended by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person.

The rated load for a sling in a choker hitch is the value in Tables 18 through 20, provided that the angle of the choke is 120 degrees or more.  For angles of choke less than 120 degrees, use the rated loads provided by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person.

For other synthetic materials and for configurations not shown, use the rated loads provided by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person.

End attachments:

Ensure that mechanical fittings used as part of a synthetic sling meet the following:

  • Materials are compatible with the mechanical and environmental requirements of the sling,
  • A qualified person verifies the suitability of mechanical or socketed fittings,
  • Fittings have sufficient strength to sustain twice the rated load of the sling,
  • Surfaces are clean and sharp edges are removed,
  • Used, repaired, or welded fittings are proof tested to twice the rated load,
  • Aluminum fittings are not used where fumes, vapors, sprays, mists, or liquids of alkalis or acids are present,
  • Fitting openings have the proper shape and size to ensure that the fitting will seat properly,
  • Thimbles are used in the sling whenever possible,
  • Thimbles have closed ears to prevent them from falling out or rotating inside the eye, and
  • Thimbles have a diameter at the bearing surface of at least twice the rope diameter.

Splicing:

Ensure that spliced synthetic fiber rope slings have been spliced in accordance with the following minimum requirements, and in addition to any recommendations of the manufacturer:

  • For tuck splices in three- and eight-strand synthetic ropes, no less than four full tucks are used. Short splices contain at least eight full tucks, four on each side of the center splice,
  • In manila rope, eye splices consist of at least three full tucks, and short splices consist of at least six full tucks, three on each side of the splice center line,
  • Strand-end tails in all tuck splices are not trimmed short, and
  • Synthetic rope slings have a minimum length of ten times the rope diameter between the last tuck of tuck splices or between the ends of the buried tails or strands of other types of splices. The diameter and width of the bearing surface of the fitting can affect the strength of the sling.  Folow the sling manufacturer's recommendations when fittings are used with the sling. Do not use knots, clips, or clamps to fabricate slings. If thimbles do not have ears, lash the thimbles to the rope to prevent rotation.

Inspections:

Designate a qualified person[1] to inspect slings and all fastenings and attachments each day before use for damage or defects.

This qualified person also performs additional periodic inspections where service conditions warrant, as determined on the basis of:

  • Frequency of sling use,
  • Severity of service conditions,
  • Nature of lifts being made, and
  • Experience gained during the service life of slings used in similar circumstances.

Make periodic inspections of natural and synthetic fiber rope slings at intervals no greater than 12 months.  A good guide to follow includes:

  • Yearly for normal service use,
  • Monthly to quarterly for severe service use, and
  • As recommended by a qualified person for special and infrequent service use.

Although OSHA's sling standard does not require you to make and maintain records of inspections, the ASME standard contains provisions on inspection records.[3]

Make a thorough inspection of slings and attachments. Items to look for include:

  • Missing or illegible sling identifications,
  • Cuts, gouges, areas of extensive fiber breakage along the length and abraded areas on the rope,
  • Damage of 10 percent or more of the ropes diameter,
  • Uniform fiber breakage along the major part of the length of the rope in the sling such that the entire rope appears covered with fuzz or whiskers,
  • Fiber breakage or melted fiber inside the rope that appears along the length at the same relative position and involves damage estimated at 10 percent of the fiber in the strand at that point,
  • Discoloration and brittle or stiff areas on any part of the sling,
  • Excessive dirt and grit in the interior of the rope structure,
  • Foreign matter that has permeated the rope and attracts and holds grit,
  • Kinks, distortion, or other damage in the rope structure,
  • Melted or charred areas that affect more than 10 percent of the diameter of the rope or affect several adjacent strands along the length to more than 10 percent of their individual diameters.
  • Poor condition of thimbles or other fittings manifested by corrosion, cracks, distortion, or localized wear, and
  • Other conditions that cause doubt as to continued use of the sling.

Where any such defect or deterioration is present, remove the sling or attachment from service immediately.

Repairing/Reconditioning:

Do not use worn or damaged slings or attachments. Do not use repaired or reconditioned fiber rope slings.  Do not use old or used rope to make up a fiber rope sling.

Modifications or alterations to end attachments or fittings are considered a repair.

Operating practices:

Ensure that natural and synthetic fiber rope slings have suitable characteristics for the type of load, hitch, and environment in which they will be used and that they are not used with loads in excess of the rated load capacities described in the appropriate tables.  Follow other safe operating practices, including:

Sling Selection

  • For multiple-leg slings used with nonsymmetrical loads, ensure that an analysis by a qualified person is performed to prevent overloading of any leg,
  • Ensure that multiple-leg slings are selected according to Tables 18 through 20 when used at the specific angles given in the table. Ensure that operation at other angles is limited to rated loads of the next lower angle given in the table or calculated by a qualified person,
  • When D/ratios (see Fig. 6) smaller than those cited in Fig. 5 are necessary, ensure that the rated load of the sling is decreased. Consult the sling manufacturer or a qualified person, and
  • Do not use a component unless it is of the proper shape and size to ensure that it is properly seated in the hook or lifting device.

Cautions to Personnel

  • Ensure that all portions of the human body are kept away from the area between the sling and the load and between the sling and the crane or hoist hook,
  • Ensure that personnel never stand in line with or next to the legs of a sling that is under tension,
  • Ensure that personnel do not stand or pass under a suspended load,
  • Ensure that personnel do not ride the sling or the load, unless the load is specifically designed and tested for carrying personnel, and
  • Do not use synthetic rope slings as bridles on suspended personnel platforms.

Effects of Environment

  • Store slings in an area where they will not be subjected to mechanical, chemical, or ultraviolet damage, or to extreme temperatures,
  • When slings are exposed to extreme temperatures, follow the guidance provided by the sling manufacturer or qualified person.
  • Do not store fiber ropes in areas where they may become impregnated with rust, and
  • Ensure that slings exposed to salt water are thoroughly rinsed with fresh water to prevent mechanical damage from salt crystals when the rope dries.

Rigging Practices

  • Ensure that slings are hitched in a manner providing control of the load,
  • Ensure that sharp edges in contact with slings are padded with material of sufficient strength to protect the sling,
  • Ensure that slings are shortened or adjusted only by methods approved by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person,
  • Ensure that, during lifting with or without a load, personnel are alert for possible snagging,
  • Ensure that, in a basket hitch, the load is balanced to prevent slippage,
  • When using a basket hitch, ensure that the legs of the sling contain or support the load from the sides, above the center of gravity, so that the load remains under control,
  • Ensure that, in a choker hitch, the choke point is only on the sling body, never on a splice or fitting,
  • Ensure that, in a choker hitch, an angle of choke less than 120 degrees is not used without reducing the rated load,
  • Ensure that slings are not constricted, bunched, or pinched by the load, hook, or any fitting,
  • Ensure that the load applied to the hook is centered in the base (bowl) of the hook to prevent point loading on the hook, unless the hook is designed for point loading,
  • Ensure that an object in the eye of a sling is not wider than one-third the length of the eye,
  • Ensure that the sling and the load are not allowed to rotate when hand-tucked slings are used in a single-leg vertical lift application. Ensure that care is taken to minimize sling rotation.
  • Do not shorten or lengthen a sling by knotting or twisting,
  • Do not rest loads on the sling,
  • Do not pull a sling from under a load when the load is resting on the sling,
  • Do not drag slings on the floor or over abrasive surfaces,
  • Do not allow shock loading, and
  • Avoid twisting and kinking.

Proof testing:

Before initial use, ensure that all new natural and synthetic fiber rope slings incorporating previously used or welded fittings and all repaired slings are proof tested by the manufacturer or a qualified person.

Other new natural and synthetic fiber rope slings need not be proof tested, although the employer may require proof testing in purchasing specifications.

Environmental effects:

Temperature

Do not allow natural and synthetic fiber rope slings to be used in contact with objects or at temperatures in excess of 194 degrees F (90 degrees C), or below minus 40 degrees F (minus 40 degrees C).

Some synthetic yarns do not retain their breaking strength during long-term exposure above 140 degrees (60 degrees C). Consult the sling manufacturer for the effects of long-term heat exposure.

Sunlight & Ultraviolet

Long-term exposure to sunlight or ultraviolet radiation can affect the strength of natural, nylon and polyester rope slings. Consult the sling manufacturer for proper retirement criteria for nylon and polyester ropes subjected to long-term storage or use in sunlight.

Chemical

Chemically active environments can affect the strength of natural and synthetic fiber rope slings. Consult the manufacturer before using a sling in such environments. Also, the presence of rust in wet nylon ropes has been found to be potentially harmful.

https://www.osha.gov/dsg/guidance/slings/nat-synth-fiber.html

OSHA Guidance on Safe Sling Use - Wire Rope Slings

Posted by Robyn

Wire Rope Slings:

Wire rope is often used in slings because of its strength, durability, abrasion resistance and ability to conform to the shape of the loads on which it is used. In addition, wire rope slings are able to lift hot materials.

Wire rope used in slings can be made of ropes with either Independent Wire Rope Core (IWRC) or a fiber-core. It should be noted that a sling manufactured with a fiber-core is usually more flexible but is less resistant to environmental damage. Conversely, a core that is made of a wire rope strand tends to have greater strength and is more resistant to heat damage.

Wire rope may be manufactured using different rope lays. The lay of a wire rope describes the direction the wires and strands are twisted during the construction of the rope. Most wire rope is right lay, regular lay. This type of rope has the widest range of applications. Wire rope slings may be made of other wire rope lays at the recommendation of the sling manufacturer or a qualified person.

Wire rope slings are made from various grades of wire rope, but the most common grades in use are Extra Improved Plow Steel (EIPS) and Extra Extra Improved Plow Steel (EEIPS).  These wire ropes are manufactured and tested in accordance with ASTM guidelines.  If other grades of wire rope are used, use them in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations and guidance.

When selecting a wire rope sling to give the best service, consider four characteristics: strength, ability to bend without distortion, ability to withstand abrasive wear, and ability to withstand abuse.

Identification:

New slings are marked by the manufacture to show:

  • The rated load for the types of hitches, and the angle upon which they are based,
  • The diameter or size, and
  • The name or trademark of the manufacturer.

Rated loads:

Rated loads (capacities) for single-leg vertical, choker, basket hitches, and two-, three-, and four-leg bridle slings for specific grades of wire rope slings are as shown in Tables 7 through 15.

For angles not shown, use the next lower angle or a qualified person to calculate the rated load. Rated loads are based on:

  • Material strength,
  • Design factor,
  • Type of hitch,
  • Angle of loading,
  • Diameter of curvature over which the sling is used (D/d) (see Fig. 4), and
  • Fabrication efficiency.

Do not use horizontal angles less than 30 degrees except as recommended by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person.

Rated loads for a sling in a choker hitch are the values shown in Table 79111314, or 15, provided that the angle of the choke is 120 degrees or more (Fig. 2).  Use the values in Fig. 2 or those from the sling manufacturer or a qualified person for angles of choke less than 120 degrees.

For other materials and for configurations not shown, use the rated loads provided by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person.

Configurations:

  • Ensure that slings made of rope with 6x19 and 6x37 classifications and cable slings have a minimum clear length of rope 10 times the component rope diameter between splices, sleeves, or end fittings unless approved by a qualified person,
  • Ensure that braided slings have a minimum clear length of rope 40 times the component rope diameter between the loops or end fittings unless approved by a qualified person,
  • Ensure that grommets and endless slings have a minimum circumferential length of 96 times the body diameter of the grommet or endless sling unless approved by a qualified person, and
  • You may use other configurations if specific data is supplied by the manufacturer or a qualified person.

End attachments:

Perform welding of handles or other accessories to end attachments, except covers to thimbles, before assembly of the sling. Ensure thatwelded end attachments are proof tested by the manufacturer or a qualified person.  Retain the certificates of proof test and make them available for examination.2  Use components such as sleeves and sockets in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendation.

Wire rope clips and hooks:

  • Do not use knots to fabricate your own slings,
  • Do not use wire rope clips to fabricate wire rope slings, except where the application precludes the use of prefabricated slings and where the sling is designed for the specific application by a qualified person,
  • Install wire rope clips according to the recommendations of the manufacturer or a qualified person,
  • Do not use slings made with wire rope clips in a choker hitch,
  • Use only wire rope clips made from drop-forged steel of the single-saddle (U-bolt) or double-saddle type clip,
  • Do not use malleable cast iron clips to fabricate slings,
  • Refer to the clip manufacturer for spacing, number of clips, and torque values,
  • Attach U-bolts to wire rope clips with the U-bolt over the dead end of the rope and the live rope resting in the clip saddle,
  • Tighten clips evenly to the recommended torque before and after the initial load is applied,
  • Regularly inspect clips to ensure that the recommended torque remains, and
  • Inspect clips periodically for wear, abuse, or damage.

Inspections:

Designate a qualified person1 to inspect slings and all fastenings and attachments each day before use for damage or defects.

The qualified person also performs additional periodic inspections where service conditions warrant, as determined on the basis of:

  • Frequency of sling use,
  • Severity of service conditions,
  • Nature of the lifts being made, and
  • Experience gained during the service life of slings used in similar circumstances.

Make periodic inspections of wire rope slings at intervals no greater than 12 months.  A good guide to follow includes:

  • Yearly for normal service use,
  • Monthly to quarterly for severe service use, and
  • As recommended by a qualified person for special and infrequent service use.

Although OSHA's sling standard does not require you to make and maintain records of inspections, the ASME standard contains provisions on inspection records.[3]

Make a thorough inspection of slings and attachments. Items to look for include:

  • Broken wires,[4]
  • Severe localized abrasion or scraping,
  • Kinking, crushing, bird caging, or any other damage to the rope structure,
  • Evidence of heat damage,
  • Crushed, deformed, or worn end attachments,
  • Severe corrosion of the rope, end attachments or fittings,
  • Missing or illegible sling identifications, and
  • Other conditions that cause doubt as to continual safe use of the sling.

Where any such defect or deterioration is present, remove the sling or attachment from service immediately.

Repairing/Reconditioning:

Do not use worn or damaged slings or attachments. Discard or repair them.

Use damaged slings only after they are repaired, reconditioned, and proof tested by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person using the following criteria:

  • Do not repair wire rope used in the sling,
  • Restrict all repairs to end attachments and fittings, and
  • Mark repaired slings to identify who made the repairs.

Modifications or alterations to end attachments or fittings are considered a repair.

Operating practices:

Ensure that wire rope slings have suitable characteristics for the type of load, hitch, and environment in which they will be used and that they are not used with loads in excess of the rated load capacities described in the appropriate tables.  When D/d ratios (Fig. 4) are smaller than those listed in the tables, consult the sling manufacturer.  Follow other safe operating practices, including:

Sling Selection

  • For multiple-leg slings used with nonsymmetrical loads, ensure that an analysis by a qualified person is performed to prevent overloading of any leg,
  • Ensure that multiple-leg slings are selected according to Tables 7 through 15 when used at the specific angles given in the tables.  Ensure that operations at other angles are limited to the rated load of the next lower angle given in the tables or calculated by a qualified person,
  • When using a multiple-leg sling, ensure that the rating shown for the single-leg sling is not exceeded in any leg of the multiple-leg sling,
  • When D/ratios (see Fig. 6) smaller than those cited in the tables are necessary, ensure that the rated load of the sling is decreased. Consult the sling manufacturer for specific data or refer to the WRTB (Wire Rope Technical Board) Wire Rope Sling Users Manual, and
  • Do not use a fitting unless it is of the proper shape and size to ensure that it seats properly in the hook or lifting device.

Cautions to Personnel

  • Ensure that all portions of the human body are kept away from the areas between the sling and the load and between the sling and the crane or hoist hook,
  • Ensure that personnel never stand in line with or next to the legs of a sling that is under tension,
  • Ensure that personnel do not stand or pass under a suspended load,
  • Ensure that personnel do not ride the sling or the load, unless the load is specifically designed and tested for carrying personnel, and
  • Do not inspect a sling by passing bare hands over the wire rope body. Broken wires, if present, may puncture the hands.

Effects of Environment

  • Store slings in an area where they will not be subjected to mechanical damage, corrosive action, moisture, extreme temperatures, or to kinking,
  • When slings are exposed to extreme temperatures, follow the guidance provided by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person,
  • Do not subject fiber-core wire rope slings to degreasing or to a solvent because of possible damage to the core, and
  • Follow the manufacturer's lubrication requirements.

Rigging Practices

  • Ensure that slings are hitched in a manner providing control of the load,
  • Ensure that sharp edges in contact with slings are padded with material of sufficient strength to protect the sling,
  • Ensure that slings are shortened or adjusted only by methods approved by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person,
  • Ensure that, during lifting with or without a load, personnel are alert for possible snagging,
  • Ensure that, in a basket hitch, the load is balanced to prevent slippage,
  • When using a basket hitch, ensure that the legs of the sling contain or support the load from the sides, above the center of gravity, so that the load remains under control,
  • Ensure that, in a choker hitch, the choke point is only on the sling body, never on a fitting,
  • Ensure that, in a choker hitch, an angle of choke less than 120 degrees is not used without reducing the rated load,
  • Ensure that slings are not constricted, bunched, or pinched by the load, hook, or any fitting,
  • Ensure that the load applied to the hook is centered in the base (bowl) of the hook to prevent point loading on the hook, unless the hook is designed for point loading,
  • Ensure that an object in the eye of a sling is not wider than one half the length of the eye,
  • Ensure that the sling is allowed to rotate when hand-tucked slings are used in a single leg vertical lift application. Minimize sling rotation,
  • Do not shorten or lengthen a sling by knotting or twisting,
  • Do not rest loads on the sling,
  • Do not pull a sling from under a load when the load is resting on the sling,
  • Do not drag slings on the floor or over abrasive surfaces,
  • Do not use slings made with wire rope clips as a choker hitch, and
  • Do not allow shock loading.

Proof testing:

Before initial use, ensure that all new swaged-socket, poured-socket, turnback-eye, mechanical joint grommets, and endless wire rope slings are proof tested by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person.

Other new wire rope slings need not be proof tested, although the employer may require proof testing in purchasing specifications.

Ensure that all welded end attachments are tested by the manufacturer or equivalent entity at twice their rated capacity before initial use.

Environmental Effects:

Permanently remove from service fiber-core wire rope slings of any grade if they are exposed to temperatures in excess of 180 degrees F (82 degrees C).

Follow the recommendations of the sling manufacturer when you use metallic-core wire rope slings of any grade at temperatures above 400 degrees F (204 degrees C) or below minus 40 degrees F (minus 40 degrees C).

Chemically active environments can affect the strength of wire rope slings. Consult the manufacturer before using a sling in such environments.

https://www.osha.gov/dsg/guidance/slings/wire.html

 


OSHA Guidance on Safe Sling Use - Alloy Steel Chain Slings

Posted by Robyn

Alloy Steel Chain Slings:

Alloy steel chains are often used because of their strength, durability, abrasion resistance and ability to conform to the shape of the loads on which they are used. In addition, these slings are able to lift hot materials.

Alloy steel chain slings are made from various grades of alloy, but the most common grades in use are grades 80 and 100.  These chains are manufactured and tested in accordance with ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) guidelines.  If other grades of chain are used, use them in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations and guidance.

Identification:

New slings are marked by the manufacture to show:

  • Size,
  • Grade,
  • The rated load, and
  • Length (reach).

In addition, slings may be marked to show:

  • Number of legs,
  • Individual sling identification (i.e., serial number), and
  • The name or trademark of the manufacturer.

Rated Loads:

Rated loads (capacities) for single-, double-, triple- and quadruple-leg slings and single- and double-basket slings used in vertical, bridle, or basket hitches are given in Tables 1 and 2 for the horizontal angles listed.

For angles not shown, use the next lower angle or have a qualified person calculate the rated load for the new angle. Rated loads are based on:

  • Material strength,
  • Design factor,
  • Type of hitch,
  • Angle of loading,

Do not use horizontal angles less than 30 degrees except as recommended by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person.

Rated loads for single-, double-, triple-, and quadruple-leg slings used in a choker hitch are given in Tables 3 and 4 for the horizontal angles listed provided that the angle of choke is greater than 120 degrees (see Fig.1).  For angles of choke less than 120 degrees, use the rated loads provided by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person.

For other materials and for configurations not shown, use the rated loads according to the sling manufacturer or a qualified person.

Attachments:

Use attachments, such as hooks, rings, oblong links, pear-shaped links, or welded or mechanical coupling links that have a rated capacity at least equal to that of the alloy steel chain with which they are used. If attachments with rated capacities lower than the chain are used, ensure that the sling is rated to the weakest component used on the sling.

Inspections:

Designate a qualified person1 to inspect slings and all fastenings and attachments each day before use for damage or defects.

This qualified person also performs additional periodic inspections where service conditions warrant, as determined on the basis of:

  • Frequency of sling use,
  • Severity of service conditions,
  • Nature of the lifts being made, and
  • Experience gained during the service life of slings used in similar circumstances.

Make periodic inspections of alloy steel chains slings at intervals no greater than 12 months.  A good guide to follow includes:

  • Yearly for normal service use,
  • Monthly to quarterly for severe service use, and
  • As recommended by a qualified person for special and infrequent service use.

Develop a system to make sure that these inspections are conducted.  To do this, you can use a recordkeeping system, such as logs or marking the inspection date on a tag attached to the sling.[2]

Make a thorough inspection of slings and attachments. Items to look for include:

  • Wear;
  • Defective welds,
  • Nicks, cracks, breaks, gouges, stretch, bends, discoloration due to excessive heat,
  • Excessive pitting or corrosion,
  • Throat opening of hooks,
  • Missing or illegible sling identifications, and
  • Other conditions that cause doubt as to continued safe use of the sling.

Where any such defect or deterioration is present, remove the sling or attachment from service immediately.

Repairing/Reconditioning:

Do not use worn or damaged alloy steel chain slings or attachments. Discard or repair them.  Use damaged slings only after they are repaired, reconditioned, and proof tested by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person using the following criteria:

  • Ensure that slings and attachments conform to the original strength requirements,
  • Mark those slings or attachments to identify who made the repairs,
  • Replace rather than repair cracked, broken, or bent links, and
  • Do not use mechanical coupling links or carbon steel repair links to repair broken lengths of alloy chain.

Operating practices:

Do not use alloy steel slings with loads exceeding the rated loads (capacities) described in Tables 1 and 3 for grade 80 or Tables 2 and 4 for grade 100.  Ensure that alloy steel chain slings not included in these tables are used only in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations.  Follow other safe operating practices, including:

Sling Selection

  • For multiple-leg slings used with nonsymmetrical loads, ensure that an analysis by a qualified person is performed to prevent overloading of any leg,
  • Ensure that multiple-leg slings are selected according to Table 1 or 2 when used at the specific angles given in the tables.  Ensure that operations at other angles are limited to the rated load of the next lower angle given in the tables or calculated by a qualified person, and
  • Do not use a component unless it is the proper shape and size to ensure that it is properly seated in the hook or lifting device.

Cautions to Personnel

  • Ensure that all portions of the human body are kept away from the areas between the sling and the load and between the sling and the crane or hoist hook,
  • Ensure that personnel never stand in line with or next to the legs of a sling that is under tension,
  • Ensure that personnel do not stand or pass under a suspended load, and
  • Ensure that personnel do not ride the sling or the load, unless the load is specifically designed and tested for carrying personnel.

Effects of Environment

  • Store slings in an area where they will not be subjected to mechanical damage, corrosive action, moisture, extreme temperatures, or to kinking, and
  • When slings are exposed to extreme temperatures, follow the guidance provided by the sling manufacturer or qualified person.

Rigging Practices

  • Ensure that slings are hitched in a manner providing control of the load,
  • Ensure that sharp edges in contact with slings are padded with material of sufficient strength to protect the sling,
  • Ensure that slings are shortened or adjusted only by methods approved by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person,
  • Ensure that, during lifting with or without a load, personnel are alert for possible snagging,
  • Ensure that, in a basket hitch, the load is balanced to prevent slippage,
  • When using a basket hitch, ensure that the legs of the sling contain or support the load from the sides, above the center of gravity, so that the load remains under control,
  • Ensure that, in a choker hitch, the choke point is only on the sling body, never on a fitting,
  • Ensure that, in a choker hitch, an angle of choke less than 120 degrees is not used without reducing the rated load,
  • Ensure that slings are not constricted, bunched, or pinched by the load, hook, or any fitting,
  • Ensure that the load applied to the hook is centered in the base (bowl) of the hook to prevent point loading on the hook, unless the hook is designed for point loading,
  • Do not shorten or lengthen a sling by knotting or twisting,
  • Do not rest loads on the sling,
  • Do not pull a sling from under a load when the load is resting on the sling,
  • Do not drag slings on the floor or over abrasive surfaces,
  • Do not allow shock loading, and
  • Avoid twisting and kinking.

Proof testing:

Before initial use of a sling, ensure that every component of a new, repaired, or reconditioned alloy steel chain sling has been proof tested by the sling manufacturer or a qualified person and meets the requirements of the American Society of Testing and Materials Specification A906-02.

Retain the certificates of proof test and make them available for examination.[2] 

Environmental Effects:

Do not use alloy steel chains that have been heated above 1,000 degrees F (538 degrees C). Remove them from service.

Alloy chain slings exposed to temperatures above 400 degrees F (205 degrees C) have reduced load ratings. Reductions in rated load for Grade 80 and Grade 100 chain slings used at and after exposure to elevated temperatures are given in Table 5.

If chain slings are to be used at temperatures below minus 40 degrees F (minus 40 degrees C), consult the chain manufacturer.

The strength of alloy steel chain slings can be affected by chemically active environments. Consult the manufacturer before the sling is to be used in chemically active environments.

Effects of wear: 

Do not use chains if the size at any point of a link is less than that stated in Table 6.  Remove the sling from service.

https://www.osha.gov/dsg/guidance/slings/alloy.html

Sling Information Overload!

Posted by Robyn

Sling Terminology

 

Factors to Consider when Choosing a Sling

 

How to choose a Sling

 

Choosing your Sling Material

 

Chain and Synthetic Product Sheets - How to order

 

Synthetic Sling Configurations and Hitches

 

Most Popular Sling Promotion

 

Sling Capacities for Synthetic - Eye and Eye Light Capacity

 

Sling Capacities for Synthetic - Eye and Eye Heavy Capacity 

 

Sling Capacities for Synthetic - Endless Light Capacity

 

Sling Capacities for Synthetic - Endless Heavy Duty

 

Sling Capacities for Round Slings

 

Sling Capacities for Grade 80 Chain Slings

 

Sling Capacities for Grade 100 Chain Slings

 

Sling Capacities for Wire Rope Slings

 

Keep watching this post - we will be adding information regularly.

Current Sling Promotion - Call us for more configurations 800-234-6098

Posted by Robyn

Trester Hoist Sling Flyer 2016.1 Revised Date.jpg

How to choose the best sling for my application.

Posted by Robyn

Trester Talk - beyond hoists heading.jpg

How do I choose the best sling for my application?

There are two basic questions when purchasing slings.  The configuration you will need to ensure a safe lift and also the material to best meet your application.  

Factors to consider when choosing a sling configuration:


Sling images.jpg

Choosing the best sling material for your application:

Sling images2.jpg


Examples of Explosion Hazards in Various Industries

Posted by Robyn

Chemical - In the chemical industry, combustible gases, liquids and solids are converted and processed in various procedures.  Explosive mixtures may be created during these processes.

Waste Disposal - At waste disposal sites, combustible gases may form.  Comprehensive technical measures are required to prevent their uncontrolled escaping and possible ignition.

Energy Production - Coal dust, which may form explosive dust/air mixtures, can occur during production, breaking and drying from coal lumps which themselves are not explosive with air.

Waste Management - The fermentation gases released during treatment of waste water in waste water treatment plants may form explosive gas/air mixtures.

Gas Suppliers - If natural gas escapes through leakages or similar methods, explosive gas/air mixtures may be created.

Metal Processing - During the production of formed metal parts, explosive metal dusts may occur during surface treatment (grinding).  This applies in particular to light metals.  These metal dusts may cause an explosion risk in separators.

Wood Processing - When processing wood workpieces, wood dust occurs, which may form explosive dust/air mixtures in filters or silos, for example.

Paint Shops - Overspray, which may occur during painting of surfaces using spray guns as well as any released solvent vapors, may form an explosive atmosphere with air.

Agriculture - Some agricultural facilities operate systems for the production of biogas.  If biogas escapes as a consequence of leakages, for example, explosive biogas/air mixtures may form.

Food - During the transporation of grain, sugar, etc., explosive dusts may occur.  When these are evacuated and separated using filters, an explosive atmosphere may occur in the filter.

Pharmaceutical - In pharmaceutical production, alcohols are frequently used as solvents.  Furthermore, active and auxiliary substances with a dust explosion hazard may also be used.

Refineries - The hydrocarbons processed in refineries are all combustible and, depending on their flash point, are capable of causing an explosive atmosphere even at ambient temperatures.

Recycling - When processing recycling waste, explosion hazards may be caused by cans that are not completely empty or other containters with combustible gases and/or liquids.  Explosion hazards may also be caused by paper or plastic dust.

Download This Flyer for more information on Precations, Standards, Groups, Zones and Classes.

YaleLift 360 ATEX for Hazardous Environments

Posted by Robyn

Hazardous Environment Hoist

The Yalelift 360 ATEX hand chain hoist is the ideal manual hoist for harsh environments.  Exceeding requirements for a classic hand chain hoist, the Yalelift 360 ATEX is built for use in explosive atmospheres and features a unique patented hand chain cover that rotates a full 360 degrees to lift loads from virtually any angle.

 

Ideal for harsh environments including:ATEX.png

More Info on Explosion-proof Environments and the options available for the Yalelift360 ATEX

Cover of brochure.jpg

Indoor Skydiving photos from Trester's "Holiday" Event

Posted by Robyn

To celebrate the end of a great 2014, the Trester employees and spouses drove to Rosemont, Illinois to try Indoor Skydiving at iFly.  Everyone that participated had a blast and all said they'd do it again.  Here are some photos from our exciting day.

Enjoy!

iFly Jay.JPG

iFly Jeremiah.JPG

iFly Robyn.JPG

Trester Hoist is now a Gold Stocking Distributor for Ingersoll Rand Hoists

Posted by Robyn

Trester Hoist is happy to announce they have partnered with Ingersoll Rand to provide more hoist options to our customers.

Ingersoll Rand is the leading provider of air powered units and Trester is now stocking MLK & HLK units that can be shipped today.

Please contact us to determine which unit will best fit your lifting needs.

Ingersoll Rand Industrial Products Catalog

HLK.png                               MLK.png

Columbus McKinnon's New Single-Reeved 2 Ton Lodestar

Posted by Robyn

CM RRS Lodestar HI-RES.jpgIntroducing CM's New Single-Reeved 2-Ton Lodestar

The Lodestar is now available as an economically 2-ton single-reeved unit.  Because it's single-reeved, the design prevents the lower hook block from capsizing and damging the hoist.  This design also decreases the headroom on the hoist nd the overall price is less than the traditional 2 part reeve hoist

You've had your hoists inspected - now what?

Posted by Robyn

Congratulations on completing your OSHA Inspection! 

Regular inspections of your overhead lifting equipment prevent accidents and costly downtime.

 Below are instructions on using our Online Inspection Reporting Program.  After your inspection is completed, your account is set up and your inspections are ready to be viewed and downloaded. 

1.  Enter tresterhoist.fieldid.com into your browser

2.  Enter login & Password given

3.  Click on the “Reporting” tab at the top of the screen

4.  Search for your inspections by just clicking “Search” or narrow down results with the filters below.  You can filter the results to just this year, just failed inspections, just manual hoists, etc. 

 Do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions, we have had great success with this program and are confident you will be as pleased with the program as other customers.  

Wiring Diagram for 5/7 Wire Station #24652

Posted by Robyn
photo 68.JPG

 

 

The 24652 control station is being supplied as a replacement for control stations CM part numbers 28615, 1010 and 24805 that were originally supplied on Lodestar, Valustar and Shopstar/Prostar Electric Chain Hoists.  

Use the below link to download directions to wire your station.

Wiring Diagram
 

 

 

CM CTP Adjustable Trolley Clamp

Posted by Robyn

CM CTP Adjustable Trolley Clamp

1 to 3 Ton Models

The CTP trolley is a heavy duty trolley with ease of installation and adjustment and still offers the strength and stability for extended life. The CTP can be adjusted quickly to the beam width by turning the main spindle and safety is ensured by turning the locking nut.

KEY FEATURES & BENEFITS
Quick & Easy Installation
  • The CTP Adjustable Trolley Clamp requires no tools for installation.
The Smart & Economical Choice
  • With its competitive price and universal hanging clevis able to accept most hoists, the CTP is a tremendous value.
Corrosion Resistance
  • Features a zinc-plated spindle for added protection against the elements.
Safe & Secure
  • The unique locking nut handle prevents spindle from loosening.
Metric Rated
Product Code Capacity Model Flange Width Minimum
Radius Curve
Wheel
Diameter
Tons lbs
05500024 1 2200 CTP/A 1T - ADJUSTABLE TROLLEY 2-1/4" to 6" 24" 2.36"
05500025 2 4400 CTP/A 2T - ADJUSTABLE TROLLEY 3" to 7-7/8" 35" 3.27"
05500026 2 4400 CTP/B 2T - ADJUSTABLE TROLLEY 7-7/8" to 11-7/8" 35" 3.27"
05500027 3 6600 CTP/A 3T - ADJUSTABLE TROLLEY 3" to 7-7/8" 45" 4.37"
05500028 3 6600 CTP/B 3T - ADJUSTABLE TROLLEY 7-7/8" to 12-1/2" 35" 4.37"

 

CM Universal Trolley - One Trolley for All Hoists

Posted by Robyn

CM Universal Trolley

1 to 3 Ton Models

The CM Universal Trolley (UT) is designed to fit virtually all Columbus McKinnon brand electric and air chain hoists up to 3 ton capacities. The UT is a low-cost rugged trolley designed and built for maximum versatility, a long service life, and is CE Compliant for global appeal.

KEY FEATURES & BENEFITS
Plain & Geared Trolley
  • Plain trolley allows for manual positioning of hoist and load. Geared trolley is ideal for applications where precise positioning is required. Standard hand chain drop in proportion to a 20 foot lift hoist.
Convertible
  • Plain trolleys equipped standard with geared trackwheels and side plate. Simply add a hand geared kit to convert unit to a geared trolley in the field.
Long Life & Low Maintenance
  • Dual Tread Wheels fits tapered or flat beams, wheels include permanently lubricated shielded ball bearings for long life and low maintenance
Easily Adjustable to Fit a Wide Range of Beams
  • The UT can be quickly and easily adjusted to fit the most popular beam flange widths.
Operator Safety
  • The UT features wrap-around side plates. Lugs provide additional security to improve operator safety and protect the wheels.
Pinned Suspension Bolts
  • Castle nuts are pinned to ensure the bolts stay tightened increasing operator safety.
Corrosion Resistant
  • Zinc plated bolts, nuts and washers along with painted frames protects against corrosion and wear.
Economical
  • An excellent low cost choice for CMCO electric and air lug mounted chain hoists. The UT is a rugged designed trolley with superior performance and long efficient service
Inventory Versatile
  • Designed to fit most CMCO brand air and electric chain hoists up to 3 ton. Reduces inventory and provides flexibility.
Lifetime Warranty
  • Best in the industry.
Fits:
  • CM Lodestar Electric Chain Hoist
  • CM Valustar Electric Chain Hoist
  • CM Shopstar Electric Chain Hoist
  • CM Airstar Air Chain Hoist
  • CM Airstar 6 Air Chain Hoist
  • CM Man Guard Electric Chain Hoist
  • Coffing JLC Electric Chain Hoist
  • Coffing EC1 Electric Chain Hoist
  • Little Mule FLC Electric Chain Hoist
  • Coffing CAH Small frame Air Chain Hoist
  • Coffing CAH Large frame Air Chain Hoist
  • Budgit BEHC (Manguard) Electric Chain Hoist
  • Budgit 2200 Air Chain Hoist
  • Budgit 6000 Air Chain Hoist
  • Yale KELC (Manguard) Electric Chain Hoist
  • Yale YJL Electric Chain Hoist
Product Code Capacity Type Flange Width Beam Height Minimum
Radius Curve
Wheel Diameter
UT1 1 Ton Plain Trolley 2.3" to 8.6" 5" to 24" 36" 2.36"
UT2 2 Ton Plain Trolley 2.3" to 8.6" 6" to 24" 45" 3.15"
UT3 3 Ton Plain Trolley 2.3" to 8.6" 8" to 24" 55" 4.41"
UT1G 1 Ton Geared Trolley 2.3" to 8.6" 5" to 24" 36" 2.36"
UT2G 2 Ton Geared Trolley 2.3" to 8.6" 6" to 24" 45" 3.15"
UT3G 3 Ton Geared Trolley 2.3" to 8.6" 8" to 24" 55" 4.41"

 

CM's New Trolleys!

Posted by Robyn

Announcing the

New CM Universal Trolley

ONE TROLLEY FOR ALL HOISTS

Columbus McKinnon announces the new 
CM Universal Trolley (UT). 
The UT is designed
to fit virtually all brands of CMCO lug mounted
electric and air chain hoists up to 3 ton 
capacities at a competitive price
.

CAPACITIES UP to 3 TONS

PLAIN & GEARED TROLLEY
The UT is available as a convertible plain unit
or a geared unit ideal for precise positioning.

THE SMART & ECONOMICAL CHOICE
With its competitive price and long service 
life, the UT offers the greatest value of any 
trolley on the market today.

CORROSION RESISTANT
Zinc-plated bolts, nuts and washers along with
painted side frames 
protect against corrosion.

INCREASED SAFETY
Castle nuts are pinned to ensure the bolts 
stay tightened increasing worker safety.

METRIC RATED & CE COMPLIANT

View Product Info

Announcing the 

New CM CTP Trolley Clamp

 VERSATILE AND EASY TO USE

Columbus McKinnon announces the new 
CM CTP Trolley Clamp. 
This heavy duty trolley
clamp is designed and built 
for easy installation
while offering superior strength 
and stability
throughout its long service life.

CAPACITIES UP to 6,600 LBS.

QUICK & EASY INSTALLATION
The CTP Adjustable Trolley Clamp requires no tools for   
installation.

THE SMART & ECONOMICAL CHOICE
With its competitive price and universal hanging
clevis able to accept most hook mounted hoists,
the CTP is a tremendous value.

CORROSION RESISTANT
Features a zinc-plated spindle for added 
protection against the elements.

SAFE & SECURE
The unique locking nut handle prevents spindle
from loosening.

METRIC RATED

View Product Info

CM Hoist Serial Number System

Posted by Robyn

CM HOIST SERIAL NUMBER SYSTEM

 

L-3487SQ

 

The lead in Letter indicates to CM what the hoist brand is.  For example:

 

B         PULLER

H        POWERSTAR

L         LODESTAR

LW      VALUSTAR

MDT   MOTOR DRIVEN TROLLEY

R         RIGGER

S         CYCLONE

 

 

 

EXAMPLE:

 L-3487SQ

 Lodestar hoist built March 2007

 

 MDT-0034NM

 Motor Driven Trolley built  December 1998

 

 

 

The 4 digit number is just a trace number assigned by our computer system to give each hoist a unique identifier.  The number has no other meaning of significance.

The last two letters are of the most significance.  The first letter indicates the year of manufacture and the last letter indicates the month of manufacture.

 

YEAR (FIRST LETTER)

 A    

1974 AND 1975

 

 N

1998 AND 1999

 B

1976 AND 1977

 

 P

2000 AND 2001

 C

1978 AND 1979

 

 Q

2002 AND 2003

 D

1980 AND 1981

 

 R

2004 AND 2005

 E

1982 AND 1983

 

 S

2006 AND 2007

 F

1984 AND 1985

 

 T

2008 AND 2009

 G

1986 AND 1987

 

 U

2010 AND 2011

 H

1988 AND 1989

 

 V

2012 AND 2013

 J

1990 AND 1991

 

 W

2014 AND 2015

 K

1992 AND 1993

 

 X

2016 AND 2017

 L

1994 AND 1995

 

 Y

2018 AND 2019

 M

1996 AND 1997

 

 Z

2020 AND 2021

 

MONTH (SECOND LETTER)

 A     

JAN FOR EVEN YEAR

 

 N

JAN FOR ODD YR

 B

FEB FOR EVEN YEAR

 

 P

FEB FOR ODD YR

 C

MAR FOR EVEN YEAR

 

 Q

MAR FOR ODD YR

 D

APR FOR EVEN YEAR

 

 R

APR FOR ODD YR

 E

MAY FOR EVEN YR

 

 S

MAY FOR ODD YR

 F

JUN FOR EVEN YEAR

 

 T

JUN FOR ODD YR

 G

JULY FOR EVEN YR

 

 U

JUL FOR ODD YR

 H

AUG FOR EVEN YR

 

 V

AUG FOR ODD YR

 J

SEPT FOR EVEN YR

 

 W

SEP FOR ODD YR

 K

OCT FOR EVEN YR

 

 X

OCT FOR ODD YR

 L

NOV FOR EVEN YR

 

 Y

NOV FOR ODD YR

 M

DEC FOR EVEN YR

 

 Z

DEC FOR ODD YR

 

 

New Breakdowns Online

Posted by Robyn

Click Here For a Complete List of Manuals 

If the manual you are looking for is not here, please give us a call or send an email to info@tresterhoist.com.  We have access to many obsolete and hard to find breakdowns.

Useful Information for our Resale Customers

Posted by Robyn

We deal with many hoist and crane distributors throughout the country.  And all of these customers are at some point hiring new salespeople and training them on hoists.  I know when I started selling hoists, the learning curve was great and my best resources were Jay, Jake & Rick who had been doing this for years already.  Most hoist & crane distributors don't have employees on-hand who specialize in exclusively hoists and can dedicate so much time to training.  I've found the below manual put together by Coffing that does an excellent job of explaining the basics of hoists.  I hope some of you can use this as all our business gets busier and you add more salespeople to your staff.

Hoist Basics includes information regarding:

  • Hand Chain Hoist applications, selection, how to price different lifts
  • Headroom on hook and trolley mount units
  • Beam Terminology
  • Lever Operated Hoist applications, selection and pricing
  • Electric Hoist pricing, trolley options, duty cycle, voltages and typical uses
  • Runway Wiring and Electrification Systems

Hoist Basics pdf file

CM Man Guard

Posted by Robyn

 

IN STOCK AT CM & READY TO SHIP
Choose the CM Man Guard
for your Heavy Duty Lifting Applications

With capacities from 1/4 to 3 tons, the CM Man Guard
electric chain hoist comes loaded with standard
features including a H4 duty motor, a rigid hook suspension
and rugged composite chain container.

Superior overload protection, a longer service life
and an optional Variable Frequency Drive (VFD)
makes the CM Man Guard the right choice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DtGQmBcW5I&feature=youtu.be

 

Happy New Year = New Improvements to our Website!

Posted by Robyn

Happy New Year to All! 

My new years resolution is to continue to add information to our website to make your jobs easier.  The new Item Lookup feature is working great and saving time for our customers.  Just enter a part#, a partial part#, description or even key number and pull information directly from our database including list price and availability. 

Another new edition are breakdowns for the New Next Generation Lodestar.  They are divided into a number of files (the complete manual is 140 pages!).  As of right now we don't have all the new part#'s and pricing loaded into the system, but hopefully soon we'll have the files and can update.

Thanks again for making 2011 a successful year and we are looking forward to working together in 2012!

New Search Feature!

Posted by Robyn

Due to popular demand, we are bringing back our search feature to our website.

Now you can enter a full or partial part, product code or description and retrieve list price, weight and quantity at Trester.

Click here to try this out!

Here are some search-tips:

1.  If you are looking for a hoist, remember we stock many of them less chain, so you may want to search for "Lodestar" or "JLC2016" to pull up all available units.  We can also change out the lifts on many hoists in a day so look for the hoist you need with a different lift.

2.  Many of the key-numbers are included in the descriptions so can be searched on, but not all, so don't depend on those alone.

3.  Availability is subject to change, these quantities are loaded the night before and may not be accurate when you check.

4.  These are not all the part numbers we have in our system, call if you can't find what you are looking for.

5.  Pricing is subject to change, CM does not consistently change their pricing so we may be faced with limited advanced notice, but we will post whatever information we get on our webpage as soon as we can. 

5.  Most Importantly - don't hesitate to call us if you have any questions, want to double-check or just want a human voice to get you pricing and availability.  We are here to help.

Introducing CM's New Lodestar!

Posted by Robyn

New lodestar hoist.gif

We are excited to announce that CM is introducing the Next Generation in Lodestars to the Industrial Market. 

  • + DC Motor
  • + Lifetime Grease-Lubricated Gear Box - No oil change required
  • + Improved Chain Life - 5 pocket Lift Wheel
  • + Quieter Operation - 80% reduction in sound pressure
  • + Exceeds H4 Requirements
  • + Comes complete with suspension and chain container

Please download the attached brochure for more information

 

 New Lodestar Brochure

CM Lodestar Price Increase

Posted by Robyn

Columbus McKinnon has decided to raise the prices on their Classic Lodestar Hoists on December 1, 2011

Download the new price sheet Here

New Price Sheet

We can take hoist orders until December 1st at the old pricing - and many can ship right away from our stock.  If you are considering another Classic Lodestar, call us today to get one before the price increase!

OSHA update for Sling Identification

Posted by Robyn

OSHA update: Facts about the NEW Sling Regulations

by Henry Brozyna on November 7, 2011

1-DSC01810-silhouetted-forweb 1-DSC01815-silhouetted-forweb

OSHA has recently updated the following regulations for slings:

  • 1910.184 (general industry)
  • 1915.122
  • 1915.113
  • 1915.118 (for shipyard employment) &
  • 1926.251 (construction).

Effective June 8, 2011, all slings, chain, synthetic & wire rope, are required to have identification tags/labels permanently attached to them. This regulation applies to slings sold and used in the United States.

Historically, companies did not require wire rope slings to have permanently affixed identification tags/labels on them; it was not required per OSHA 1910. This has now changed. Tags/labels are now required.

Also, original load capacity tables found in the OSHA standards were based on information found in ASME B30.9 dating back to 1971. These are now obsolete and no longer reflect the current ASME B30.9 industry standards. New tables reflect the current industry standards for working load limits for slings, chain, and synthetic or wire rope.

Changes include:

  • All load charts for slings have been updated to current industry standards per ASME B30.9.
  • All slings, regardless if made of chain, wire rope or synthetic, must be marked with a tag/label. Now only properly tagged/labeled slings can be used.
  • Slings with detached tags/labels must be removed from service until new tags/labels can be permanently reattached.

To view this new change in its entirety or to download a copy go to:  http://www.osha.gov/FedReg_osha_pdf/FED20110608.pdf

Which Contactor do you Need?

Posted by Robyn 2133 days ago

***Updated information on this topic posted 5/24/2012**

The below post I refer customers to more often than anything else.  Recently I found a CM Technical Bulletin from 11/2007 regarding this topic and with more information on the dates CM used the various contactors.  Here is the file, feel free to save or print it for your own use.

Reversing Contactor & Speed Selecting Relay Chart           Technical Bulletin 11/07

Thank you!

Original Post:

If you've ever called us for a contactor, you've probably been asked the question, "what brand is your current contactor?".  CM and Coffing have used a number of different brands in their hoists in the past and although the current contactor will work in your unit - installing it could be a harder than necessary process.  If you purchase the same brand contactor you are taking out of the hoist, the install will be quick and simple - and you won't have to drill extra holes in your hoist to make it fit. 

Here are the most common contactors for CM and Coffing hoists, a picture, brief description and hoists they have been used on.  Hopefully this information will help you determine which contactor will work best in your hoist.

Don't hesitate to call or email with any questions. 

800-234-6098

info@tresterhoist.com

28835c.gif

MSD - Struthers Dunn Contactor

Part# 28835

115 v. Coils

Used on Valustars (WB, WF, WH, WL, WR), CM 635 Motor Driven Trolley, 1 & 2 speed large EC's:         (EC-2032, EC-4016, EC-4024, EC-6010, EC-6016,   EC-8008, EC-8012, EC-10005, EC-10008

 

28837c.gif

 

Part# 28837

MSD

24 v. Coils

Used on CM 635 Motor Driven Trolley, All EC's, All ELC's

 

27885c.gif

 

Part# 27885

Square D

115 v. Coils

Used on small EC's: (EC-0516, EC-0532, EC-0564,  EC-1009, EC-1016, EC-1032, EC-2004, EC-2008,    EC-2012, EC-2016, EC-4006, EC-4008, EC-6005

 

28746c.gif

 

Part# 28746

Square D

24 v. Coils

Used on Lodestars (A-RRT2)

 

24729c.gif

Part# 24729

Telemcanique / Schneider

115 v. Coils

Used on 1 hp, 3 phase, 1 & 2 speed JLC's

 

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Part# 24791

Telemecanique / Schneider

24 v. Coils

Used on 1 hp, 1 phase, JLC's

 

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Part# 24799

Telemecanique / Schneider

110 v. Coils

Used on 3 phase Lodestars (A-RRT2)

Used on up to 1/2 hp, 1 & 2 speed JLC's

 

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Part# 25943

Telemecanique / Schneider

24 v. Coils

Used on 1 hp, 3 phase, 1 & 2 speed JLC's

 

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Part# 27142

Telemecanique / Schneider

115 v. Coils

Used on single phase, large Lodestars (J, L, R, RT)

 

   
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Part# 28553

Telemecanique / Scheider

115 v. Coils

Used on Lodestars (A-RRT2)

 

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Part# 28905

Telemecanique / Schneider

115 v. Coils

This is used on 1 hp, 1 phase JLC's

 

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Part# 28878

Telemecanique / Schneider

24 v. Coils

This is a 2 speed selector relay for 2 speed hoists

Used on CM Lodestars and Coffing JLC's

 

Current Pricing

Posted by Robyn

Trester Hoist is now offering Electronic Inspection Reporting

Posted by Robyn 2401 days ago

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Inspection Schedules

Posted by Robyn 2420 days ago

How often must a hoist be inspected?

To keep a hoist operating at peak efficiency, it is necessary to implement a regular inspection program.  This will allow for the replacement of parts that are worn or damaged prior to the hoist becoming unsafe.  The inspection intervals are based upon the type of service and the degree of exposure to wear that may lead to deterioration or malfunction of the hoists critical components.

The type of service to which a hoist is subjected is classified as "normal", "heavy" or "severe.

Normal Service: Involves operation with randomly distributed loads within the rated load limit, or uniform loads less than 65% of rated load for not more than 15% of the time from manual hoists, and 25% of the time for powered hoists.

Heavy Service: Involves operating the hoist within the rated load limit which exceeds normal service.

Severe Service: Normal or heavy service with abnormal operating conditions.

Two classes of inspection; frequent and periodic, must be performed.

Frequent Inspections:  These inspections are visual inspections by the operator or other designated personnel.  Records of these inspections are not required.  The frequent inspections must be performed monthly for normal service, weekly to monthly for heavy service and daily to weekly for severe service.

Periodic Inspections:  These inspections are visual inspections of external conditions by an appointed person.  Records of periodic inspections are to be kept for continuing evaluation of the condition of the hoist.  Periodic inspections are to be conducted yearly for normal service, semi-annually for heavy service and quarterly for severe service.

Any deficiencies found in an inspection must be corrected prior to a hoist being returned to service.  Also, external conditions may show the need to disassemble a hoist for a more detailed examination.

We, at Trester Hoist, stand ready to assist and advise you in establishing an ongoing, thorough inspection program for your hoists.  We provide inspection services for many companies in Wisconsin and our Certified Hoist Technicians are very qualified to handle all of your hoist needs.

- Fred Steinke, Sales Manager fred@tresterhoist.com

 

Welcome to our New Website!

Posted by Robyn

Hello and Welcome to the new and improved tresterhoist.com!

We have made exciting improvements and are eager to hear your input. 

Changes to look for:

            Current hoist manuals (with breakdowns)

            Current user net pricing on hoists and parts

            More hoist models with options

 

The biggest change is our “Trester Talk” section.  We hope to bring some informational insight to our customers.  Look for an article from Fred on Hoist Safety, an article from Chris on routine inspections and from Jay and Jake on PB station and contactor options. 

 

Thanks for checking us out and as always, let us know how we can help you.